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Join us for upcoming trainings

2018 Ohio Microbusiness Summit

If your organization has an existing microbusiness development program or if you want to learn more about microbusiness development in Ohio,

Featured Speaker, Gary Schoeniger Founder & CEO of the Entrepreneurial Learning Initiative, Gary is the co-author of Who Owns the Ice House? Eight Life Lessons from an Unlikely Entrepreneur.

don’t miss this summit!

Join us for a day of informative sessions, discussion, and networking with microbusiness program providers throughout the state.

Featured Speaker, Gary Schoeniger  Founder & CEO of the Entrepreneurial Learning Initiative.  Gary is the co-author of Who Owns the Ice House? Eight Life Lessons from an Unlikely Entrepreneur.

The Entrepreneurial Learning Initiative (ELI) is a global thought leader dedicated to expanding human potential through entrepreneurial mindset education. ELI serves academic institutions, government agencies, profit, and nonprofit organizations around the world to empower their constituents with an entrepreneurial mindset through professional development, certification training, curriculum content, and consulting.

ELI is the creator of the Ice House Entrepreneurship Programs, which has been presented to the United Nations General Assembly, the Papal Council for Peace and Justice at the Vatican, and the European Commission.

In addition to the guest speaker, the agenda will include networking and a tour of ECDI’s Women’s Business Center and the Food Commissary.  This event is free to attend and lunch will be provided.
2018 Ohio Microbusiness Summit
May 17, 2018  /  9:30 AM – 3:00 PM
Register Here!
ECDI
1655 Old Leonard Avenue
Columbus, OH 43219
This summit is supported by Citizens Bank.

Harnessing the Forces of Gentrification to Improve your Neighborhood

For years, communities working to improve their economy have struggled with the forces of gentrification. In this workshop, we will explore how to define and measure gentrification, and practical tools to promote inclusive neighborhood development.

Presenters for this training are Brian Higgins of Parsons Area Redevelopment Corporation and Mark Barbash. This event is free to attend. Attendees will have lunch on their own.

Harnessing the Forces of Gentrification to Improve your Neighborhood
June 7, 2018  /  10:00 AM – 3:00 PM
Register Here!

Ohio CDC Association
100 E. Broad Street, 6th Floor
Columbus, OH 43215

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State of the Arts: Akron’s Kenmore neighborhood reimagined

Mark Arehart of Ohio Public Radio:

“A new coloring book features public spaces in one Akron neighborhood. It’s a mural project called the Kenmore Imagineer and residents hope it will add a splash of color to Kenmore Boulevard.

The mural project, Kenmore, Ohio, will appear along Kenmore Boulevard.
CALEB ARONHALT

“Kenmore gets a bad rap outside of Kenmore, and even sometimes inside of Kenmore,” Tina Boyes, executive director of the Kenmore Neighborhood Alliance, said.

It was once its own city, with a bustling downtown full of shops and theaters and even streetcars running along Kenmore Boulevard.

“I think people have seen the decline of the neighborhood due to disinvestment of industry,” she said.

But she believes the neighborhood is coming back. It has several music venues, a barber shop, guitar shops, comic book stores and even an indoor skate park.

“Kenmore has so much life and so much vibrancy that you don’t see on the surface,” she said.”

Read more (and listen to the story) from Ohio Public Radio that talks about exciting work in the Akron neighborhood and one of OCDCA’s newer members Kenmore Neighborhood Alliance.

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A new revitalization model: demand creation

Guest article from Revitalization News:

“When you chat with your grandmother about urban revitalization, the words that you use and the images she has in her head are likely focused on brick, stone, or clapboard buildings; on tree-lined, brick-paved streets; or on walkable main streets teeming with local retailers, hung shingles, and small offices or apartments above.

It is all about saving places. And we do it for a host of good reasons, be they economic, emotional, or to take advantage of a particular underserved market that wants to move in, not out to the hinterland exurbs.

The strategies we have relied upon mirror those images and words that we use. We focus, and understandably so, on the buildings, streets, and public spaces that make up the neighborhoods we want to save. We wrap policies around these places like bubble wrap, hoping to stem the dis- or mal-investment that has plagued them for a half century.

Design codes and zoning overlays institutionalize the wisdom of previous eras that we seem to be losing, the intuition that allowed us to build great places for millennia. To bridge the gap between what a landowner can invest in a building and what she can reasonably expect in return through rents, we have created a competitive set of tax credits that can be swapped for cash to pour into repointing the brick, popping in new windows, restoring the tin ceiling, and patching the roof.

When successful, we do save the place. Blood, sweat, tears and years go into stabilizing and restoring the bricks and mortar. Retailers open up shop, people move back in, and selfies are taken with your restored neighborhood serving as the memorable backdrop.

But saving that street or adopting that overlay district does not automatically save the neighborhood and, even if it does, it does not necessarily jump the tracks to the next neighborhood even if it exhibits some of the same great buildings and streets that dot your newly revitalized district. The movement does not scale on its own. What is more, even as we have restored investment in the place, real and often valid concerns about how we are restoring investment in the people that for generations stuck it out in the that place grow.

Enter gentrification and displacement.

And when we ignore the movement’s ability to scale and resist the difficult conversations about racial, cultural, and economic inclusion, we expose the preservation movement’s broad side to criticisms about Disneyification and loss of authenticity while isolating the pursuit of revitalization to a narrowing class of advocates that have the resources to navigate the bureaucracy, planning, lending, and trade skills necessary to bring a place back from the brink. This threatens to slow and narrow the movement right when we need to accelerate and broaden it the most.

These shortcomings are due, in large part, to how we go about revitalizing places. In other words: the supply-only approach of property acquisition, tax credits, building stabilization and restoration, and protection policies limit the risks of doing it all. And its importance cannot be underestimated. But while doing all of that hard work with our right hands, it is critical that we do something just as important with our left.

That something is a strategy we’ve come to call Demand Discovery where, through targeted activation of overlooked spaces, programming, storytelling, and ongoing tweaking, we figure out where, how, who, and what to focus on while removing the market’s mental obstacles preventing it from coming to the place you are trying to save.

A central observation of demand discovery is that, over time, we have value engineered out of the building process two key steps. We are likely to still engage in some form of planning (be it in a church basement or in a boardroom) with the intended goal of sustained development and investment.

But the leap between the two is proving to be too vast. We are missing one step by which we test those planning ideas through quick, low-cost, low-risk activations of the idea. We miss another that makes permanent the early and most successful aspects of those activations through smart, small development of the amenities and other uses that virtually all plans wish to bring back to a place. This holds just as true for a coffee shop as it does for a walkable street and allows our bigger development to be more sophisticated, market-driven (ie smarter use of gap funding), and integrated into the fabric of a place.

It is not your grandma’s picture of revitalization but, in fact, more like how places grew when she was a little girl through small scale trial and error that incrementally evolves into an extraordinary place.”

Read the full piece here, which details work occurring in the Cincinnati member Walnut Hills Redevelopment Foundation.

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CDC Impact: Community Engagement

Over the last few years, Ohio CDC Association (OCDCA) has been working hard to quantify the impact of CDCs throughout Ohio. We’ve been collecting and analyzing data from our member organizations and are excited to share our findings – especially in digestible bits.

We are pleased to state that, each year, over one million people benefit from the work of Ohio’s CDCs.

This week’s theme is community engagement – a deeply critical component to all community development work. The central idea to the CDC industry is that local communities know their people and places the best and are best suited to enact change to their specific challenges.

Through local engagement, residents can take ownership of their community and are empowered to make lasting changes through grass roots efforts.  

Did you know that, in 2016, Ohio CDCs:

  • Hosted community events that were attended by over 159,000 people;
  • Recruited almost 37,000 volunteers of which nearly 6,500 were youth;
  • Organized volunteers that performed more than 559,000 hours of service in their communities.

For example, one CDC in northeast Ohio holds an annual day of service on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, and in 2016, countless volunteers helped board up 20 vacant homes in single degree temperatures.

Another community development group in southeast Ohio mobilized many residents to help bring a grocery store to their rural food desert.

Community engagement is inherent in community development work, as CDCs make a place at the proverbial table for all the voices in their community.

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CDC Impact: Community Economic Development

Over the last few years, Ohio CDC Association (OCDCA) has been working hard to quantify the impact of CDCs throughout Ohio. We’ve been collecting and analyzing data from our member organizations and are excited to share our findings – especially in digestible bits.

We are pleased to state that, each year, over one million people benefit from the work of Ohio’s CDCs.

This week we focus on community economic development – something nearly all OCDCA members do. Community economic development

  • Creates jobs and entrepreneurship opportunities;
  • Builds individual and community wealth and;
  • Attracts capital to disinvested communities.

Did you know that, in 2016, Ohio CDCs:

  • Invested nearly $35,000,000 to develop the economy in their communities, re-connecting community residents to workforce opportunities, creating jobs, and fostering entrepreneurship;
  • Helped over 42,000 households with job training and small business development, resulting in 1,000 new or expanded local businesses, which created nearly 2,500 jobs in low-income communities;
  • Re-purposed or rehabilitated over 1,000 vacant properties.

There are countless ways in which these activities occur around the state.

For example, in 2016, one CDC in Appalachia loaned approximately $130,000 to new and existing small businesses, which resulted in over 118 new or retained jobs.Local small businesses that sought expansion assistance saw an average 15% increase in sales as a result of this assistance.

Another CDC in Columbus finished and sold a 55,000 square foot warehouse to a local makers space, which now serves a community hub for the neighborhood and the city.

Community economic development is at the center of the work of Ohio’s CDCs. Through the work of the 245+ CDCs across the state, Ohio is fostering an environment that comprehensively improves life opportunities for all Ohioans.

 

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How ‘Not in my backyard’ became ‘Not in my neighborhood’

Emily Badger of The New York Times:

In Seattle, the neighbors don’t want apartments for formerly homeless seniors nearby. In Los Angeles, they don’t want more high-rises. In San Jose, Calif., they don’t want tiny homes. In Phoenix, they don’t want design that’s not midcentury modern.

Homeowners in each of these places share a common conviction: that owning a parcel of land gives them a right to shape the world beyond its boundaries.

The roots of this idea are as old as nuisance laws that have tried to limit how one property owner can harm another. Over the decades, though, homeowners have expanded their claim on the world beyond their lot lines. This means they look out for schools and streets in ways that are vital to American communities. But increasingly it also means the senior affordable housing, the high-rises and the tiny homes — also arguably vital to the larger community — are never built.

“One of the reasons why we always justified the mortgage interest deduction was we wanted people to be rooted in their communities,” said Vicki Been, the faculty director of New York University’s Furman Center and a former commissioner of Housing Preservation and Development in New York City.

The idea was for people to be invested in the quality of nearby schools, the safety of neighborhood parks and the outcomes of local elections. In one sense, the triumph of this idea should be celebrated, she said. But the danger of it is becoming more apparent, too.

“Communities always need to be changing,” she said, “and we can’t have a process that gives every individual sort of a veto over change.”

Read the full piece here, which details NIMBYish and how it has changed over time.

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Lakewood Grocer Donates To Needy Family

Chris Mosby of Patch:

Constantino’s may still be new in town, but the family-owned grocer is already making an impact for local families. LakewoodAlive‘s Housing Outreach Program identified a family in-need this holiday season and Constantino’s donated $150 of groceries.

“We are so happy to provide this gift to one of our Lakewood residents and thankful for the commitment Andrew Revy and Constantino’s has already shown to the Lakewood community since opening last week.” said Allison Urbanek, LakewoodAlive housing outreach program director.

Constantino’s opened Dec. 6 at the site of the former Nature’s Bin grocery. Co-owners Andrew and Anna Revy are both Lakewood High School alum and current residents. Andrew told Patch at the ribbon cutting event on Dec. 5 that he wanted to be the “perfect embodiment of a local grocer.”

Andrew also said he and his family wanted to serve their own neighborhood. The Revys already operate four other stores around the Cleveland area. The Lakewood location is the first Constantino’s store in a Greater Cleveland suburb.

Read the whole story here.

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WIN’s healthy housing initiative

Monday, OCDCA member, Working in Neighborhoods chatted on WVXU’s Cincinnati Edition regarding their healthy housing initiative.

Working In Neighborhoods (WIN) empowers people to make informed choices for themselves and their neighborhoods through community building, home ownership, and economic learning. WIN’s Healthy Housing Initiative calls for building or modifying 50 net zero energy-efficient, low-to-moderate cost homes in Cincinnati.

Listen to the 25 minute segment here!

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Making the real estate deal in the neighborhood

Join OCDCA and Mark Barbash for the next phase of the Art of the Deal.

The goal of the session is to provide participants with a basic framework that enables a CDC to play a role in development.

Using a few representative case studies, the course will walk through the development components, identifying key information to obtain and questions to ask.

The course would be taught from the perspective of a CDC, while also trying to “get into the heads” of the project stakeholders.

Event and Date Location Registration
Making the Real Estate Deal in the Neighborhood
September 15, 2016
9:30 AM – 4:00 PM
Chase Building
100 E. Broad Street
6th Floor Board Room
Columbus, OH 43215
Register Here!

This is sponsored by Citizen’s Bank and will include a round table lunch discussion with Citizens that will focus on two main things:

How a Bank Makes a Decision: This primarily covers the credit factors in a real estate development deal including value determination, cash flow analysis, market analysis, cash flow coverage, collateral coverage, etc.

Rules of the Game: This focuses on some of the non-credit factors: how a bank evaluates the experience of a developer, how banks look at neighborhood deals, what’s the difference between a community bank and a larger regional bank (from the perspective of a neighborhood developer), and how banks look at working with public programs.

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