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CDC Impact: Community Economic Development

Over the last few years, Ohio CDC Association (OCDCA) has been working hard to quantify the impact of CDCs throughout Ohio. We’ve been collecting and analyzing data from our member organizations and are excited to share our findings – especially in digestible bits.

We are pleased to state that, each year, over one million people benefit from the work of Ohio’s CDCs.

This week we focus on community economic development – something nearly all OCDCA members do. Community economic development

  • Creates jobs and entrepreneurship opportunities;
  • Builds individual and community wealth and;
  • Attracts capital to disinvested communities.

Did you know that, in 2016, Ohio CDCs:

  • Invested nearly $35,000,000 to develop the economy in their communities, re-connecting community residents to workforce opportunities, creating jobs, and fostering entrepreneurship;
  • Helped over 42,000 households with job training and small business development, resulting in 1,000 new or expanded local businesses, which created nearly 2,500 jobs in low-income communities;
  • Re-purposed or rehabilitated over 1,000 vacant properties.

There are countless ways in which these activities occur around the state.

For example, in 2016, one CDC in Appalachia loaned approximately $130,000 to new and existing small businesses, which resulted in over 118 new or retained jobs.Local small businesses that sought expansion assistance saw an average 15% increase in sales as a result of this assistance.

Another CDC in Columbus finished and sold a 55,000 square foot warehouse to a local makers space, which now serves a community hub for the neighborhood and the city.

Community economic development is at the center of the work of Ohio’s CDCs. Through the work of the 245+ CDCs across the state, Ohio is fostering an environment that comprehensively improves life opportunities for all Ohioans.

 

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Fix a house, learn job skills in this Middletown program

Ed Richter of The Journal-News:

Starting Feb. 12, the newest Build-Up Academy will start its next class to rehab a house in Middletown.

The Build-Up Academies is a program operated by the nonprofit Supports to Encourage Low-Income Families that provides job training for people looking to get into a construction trade by rehabbing or flipping property.

John Post, SELF’s housing coordinator, said the program is a natural outgrowth of the nonprofit’s other activities and programs, which include various volunteer work camps in the summer, and community blitzes throughout the year helping low-income people with home repairs and other maintenance issues.

Post said the Build-Up Academies, now in its third year, provides free construction skills training to classes of nine to 18 students, ages 18 to 40, who meet for nearly four hours a night, four nights a week for nine weeks on the project.

The students also receive construction technology or construction management certificate through an agreement with Cincinnati State. The program offers opportunities to network with local employers or apply for apprenticeships in the construction field upon graduation. In addition there are incentives, employment and life skills training, emergency supports and even steel-toed boots and a starter tool set upon graduation from the program.

“It’s been a great program for us,” he said. “We’ve had a lot of great success stories.”

Read the whole story here.

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OCDCA announces microbusiness development program grantees

These past two months have been a very exciting time for OCDCA and its members.

Late last month, through the use of an impartial review committee, we awarded grants to fourteen members for their microbusiness programs through the Ohio Microbusiness Development Program.

The purpose of the Ohio Microbusiness Development Program is to provide funding for CDCs to further develop a local delivery system that encourages microbusiness development, provides low- and moderate-income households with access to capital for business development and self-employment, and creates and retains long-term jobs in the private sector.

Funding for this can be in the form of either training or technical assistance, or direct assistance to the business in the form of a loan, with loan funds repaid into a local microbusiness revolving loan fund. Funding for this program comes from Ohio Development Services Agency with additional support for OCDCA’s Recoverable Grant Fund through a significant gift from Fifth Third Bank with additional support from US Bank Foundation. View a list of all the OCDCA funders.

Awarded Organizations

Adams Brown Community Action Partnership

Appalachian Center for Economic Networks

Asian Services in Action, Inc.

Community Action Partnership of the Greater Dayton Area

Community Action Committee of Pike County

Economic and Community Development Institute

Franklinton Urban Empowerment Lab

Greater Cincinnati Microenterprise Initiative

HHWP Community Action Agency

INCREASE Community Development Corporation

Southern Perry Incubation Center for Entrepreneurs

Supports to Encourage Low Income Families

Vinton County Economic Development Board

Youngstown Neighborhood Development Corporation

Congrats to all of the selected organization! For more information about the Ohio Microbusiness Development Program, please contact Nate Coffman at ncoffman AT ohiocdc.org.

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Cincinnati’s first minority-owned brewery coming to Walnut Hills in 2018

Exciting news coming out of Cincinnati, regarding an entrepreneur dedicated to revitalization, two OCDCA members, and beer…sweet, sweet, local beer.

Allison Smith Cohen of Soapbox Cincinnati:

“Recently announced Esoteric Brewing Company has several tactics for setting itself apart from others, starting with the fact that it will be the first minority-owned brewery in the city. Founder and CEO Brian Jackson honed his skills at MadTree before deciding to set off on his own; he’s also a MORTAR grad.

“’Esoteric’ means ‘sophistication,’” says Jackson. “We’re trying to elevate the palates of customers and the entire experience of people coming to breweries in Cincinnati.”

He plans to offer a diverse selection of brews, which will include local favorites like traditional American IPAs and stouts, as well as more complex beers like his award-winning Belgian quadruple, Nirvana.

Jackson picked a location that matches that sense of style and sophistication: the historic Paramount building in Walnut Hills, which was once known as Cincinnati’s “second downtown.”

The beautiful Art Deco-style building from 1910 has sat empty for a decade, but was purchased last year by the Walnut Hills Redevelopment Foundation, and is currently undergoing renovations. Partnering with several community organizations, Esoteric plans to use the roaring ’20s vibe of the space to create a modern speakeasy.”

Read the whole story here.

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OCDCA receives significant gift from Fifth Third Bank for microbusiness

There are almost 28 million small businesses in the U.S. and over 22 million are microbusinesses with no additional payroll or employees. These businesses are sources of local and personal pride in their communities. The U.S. Small Business Administration found that since 1995, 2 out of every 3 new jobs created have come from small businesses. They are indeed the backbone of the economy, but many microentrepreneurs lack access to traditional banking resources.

In 2013, OCDCA began administration of the Ohio Microbusiness Development Grant Program (OMBDP) via the Ohio Development Services Agency (ODSA). The OMBDP currently provides funding support on a competitive basis to 13 community development organizations to foster microbusiness development for low-to-moderate income entrepreneurs in the form of training, technical assistance, and loan fund development. Through this program, community development organizations strengthen the economic health of their communities by investing time and resources into these microbusinesses, which become community assets.

In 2015 alone, the OMBDP:

  • Provided over 2,100 technical assistance consultations to microbusinesses
  • Educated over 1,000 aspiring entrepreneurs
  • Started or expanded over 200 businesses
  • Created or retained almost 300 jobs in low-to-moderate income communities

OCDCA created the Ohio Microbusiness Recoverable Grant Fund to provide a sustainable pool of funding to these community development organizations, who can then use the funds to make loans to local microentrepreneurs in their community.

The Ohio Microbusiness Recoverable Grant Fund (RGF) is a statewide fund, from which OCDCA makes recoverable grants to sub-sites of OCDCA’s Microbusiness Development Grant Program, in order for the sub-site to then make loans to their low-to-moderate income microentrepreneur clients. Loan repayments are paid back to the subsite who repays OCDCA to replenish the grant fund, so that more grants for loans to microentrepreneurs can be made in the future. 

We at Ohio CDC Association are eager to announce that the OMBDP Recoverable Grant Fund received a significant gift from Fifth Third Bank. As this program gets rolling, we are delighted to strengthen our partnership with Fifth Third Bank to bolster Ohio microbusiness development programs and low-to-moderate income entrepreneurs throughout the state.

Thank you, Fifth Third Bank!

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DeSoto Bass, Hilltop public housing residents get job help

Big news from Dayton featuring OCDCA member Greater Dayton Premier Management and CareSource Life Services!

Cory Frolik for Dayton Daily News:

Aquanna Quarles last year met with then-Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro. Quarles has lived in DeSoto Bass since 2007. Quarles, who enrolled in Greater Dayton Premier Management’s self-sufficiency program, was a shift manager and wanted to keep moving up the ladder. Photo by Cornelius Frolik.

A new job center opened this week in the heart of the DeSoto Bass Courts in West Dayton that will assist public housing residents with finding jobs and better-paying work.

Residents of the roughly 500 apartments in the DeSoto Bass and nearby Hilltop Homes public housing developments now have access to an on-site job center that has eight offices for community organizations, a computer lab, kitchen and meeting space.

The center will connect job-seekers with employers, offer work-readiness training and will help residents with job placement and financial literacy services, officials said.

The center just opened, and already 20 residents have signed up for the Jobs-Plus program, and two have already found work, said Jennifer Heapy, CEO of Greater Dayton Premier Management, the local public housing authority.

In September, the secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) visited the DeSoto Bass Courts housing project to announce it was selected for a $2.4 million grant as part of the federal Jobs-Plus Initiative Program.

Greater Dayton Premier Management was one of only six public housing authorities out of 4,000 nationwide to receive a Jobs-Plus grant award last year. The agency last year also received a $1.5 million federal grant to develop a plan to remake the West Dayton neighborhood around DeSoto Bass.

The job center will help residents learn a trade, obtain a GED, improve their jobs skills and make other gains that help people get their first job or climb the ladder if they are already employed to become more self-sufficient and earn higher wages, Heapy said.

When residents participate in the Jobs-Plus program, they receive incentives so that their rental subsidies do not decrease when their wages rise, officials said. People in Jobs-Plus can get a 100 percent “income disregard” for up to two years.

Jobs-Plus, a four-year grant, will help pull public housing residents out of poverty by permitting them to advance in their jobs and careers to earn more money without having to fear that they will hit a benefits cliff and lose some of their rental subsidies, officials said.

Premier Management has hired a Jobs-Plus coordinator and has partnered with CareSource’s Life Services department to try to help residents obtain jobs that pay living wages, Heapy said.

CareSource offers its members services to help overcome obstacles to employment, including interview and job training, transportation and childcare assistance and budget and financial counseling.

Read the whole article here.

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Trumbull group boasts successful year with Warren revitalization

By WKBN’s Christina Mullen:

WARREN, Ohio (WKBN) – Trumbull Neighborhood Partnership (TNP) makes strides every year in revitalizing the city of Warren and this past year proved to be a successful one, especially with a new program that created jobs in the city.

Through grant funds TNP was able to hire workers to help with their Building a Better Warren program, creating eight full-time positions.

The new positions are designed to train workers to help with renovating properties and prepping structures for demolition.

“Going in and harvesting, salvaging all the materials that are useful. Doing greening insulation after a demolition and doing the maintenance that comes with owning a lot of vacant lots, mowing, trimming, whatever else,” said Matt Martin, Trumbull Neighborhood Partnership.

Experienced contractors will be training the new hires.

Get the full story here!

 

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OCDCA receives program support grant from U.S. Bank Foundation

Ohio CDC Association (OCDCA) is pleased to announce the award of $5,000 from the U.S. Bank Foundation for the Ohio Microbusiness Development Recoverable Grant Fund.

Previously administered by the state of Ohio, in 2013, OCDCA assumed direction of the Ohio Microbusiness Development Program (OMDP) through an agreement with Ohio Development Services Agency (ODSA). The purpose of the OMDP is to provide funding for community based organizations to further develop a local delivery system that encourages microbusiness development, provides low- and moderate-income (LMI) households with access to capital for business development and self-employment, and creates and retains long-term jobs in the private sector.

Nature’s Magic owner, Danielle Young, in Athens, Ohio received assistance with her business from ACEnet, an OMDP member serving Southeast Ohio. Here she promotes her products at a Kroger Supermarket.

Assistance enabled by this funding includes training, TA, or lending, with loan funds repaid into a local microbusiness recoverable grant fund.

Outcomes for our microbusiness program are strong. In 2015 we assisted 1,413 households, expanded 82 businesses and created or retained 277 jobs.

The Ohio Microbusiness Recoverable Grant Fund is a statewide fund that allows OCDCA to provide funds to member organizations in the OMDP to make micro loans to LMI entrepreneur clients. Repaid grants are placed back into the fund so that more loans can be made in the future. After an organization has approved a microloan for its client through its loan approval process, it requests a recoverable grant from OCDCA. A 1:1 match is required to use funds from the recoverable grant fund.

By expanding the OMDP with the recoverable grant fund, we continue lending to LMI entrepreneurs while leveraging the ODSA dollars to meet the biggest need of the OMDP organizations:  small business development training, TA and administrative costs.

Leslie Schaller, Deonna Barnett, and Liberty Merrill provide insights on marketing microbusiness programs, and reporting data at a Ohio Microbusiness Development Program Summit.

Funding for the Ohio Microbusiness Development Program comes from the Ohio Housing Trust Fund (OHTF) through the Ohio Development Services Agency (ODSA); therefore, we are very excited and thankful to have these additional dollars for the Recoverable Grant Fund from U.S. Bank Foundation!

 

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TNP lands federal grant of $225,000 for project, jobs

From Raymond L. Smith via the Tribune Chronicle:

“WARREN — A $225,000 grant will be used to renovate a Mahoning Avenue residence and carriage house that eventually will house offices for Trumbull Neighborhood Partnership and serve as a training center for new employees of the nonprofit.

The funding will help create at least eight full-time positions at TNP under a program called Building a Better Warren, and TNP will hire low-income individuals to fill a majority of the positions.

“Those hired will be taught skills to work in modules that include reconstruction and salvaging, home rehabilitation, landscape installation and landscape maintenance,” Matt Martin, executive director of TNP, said. “This is an opportunity to put low-income residents to work.”

TNP will leverage some of its existing  demolition dollars with its work with the Trumbull County Land Reutilization Corp. to focus rehabilitation work on properties in the corporation’s current inventory.

“This program is all about putting our residents to work in quality, year-round jobs revitalizing our neighborhoods,” Martin said. “We have merged the need for blight remediation with the need for meaningful workforce development, and we have leveraged multiple resources and partnerships to create this opportunity. This is an exciting program for our community.”

Approximately $200,000 of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services grant will be used for the renovation project at 736 Mahoning Ave. About $25,000 will be used to purchase equipment. The federal dollars are being provided through the HHS Community Economic Development grant program.

“None of this money will be used to pay salaries or benefits,” Martin said. “We will  train people to salvage materials from properties scheduled to be demolished, as well as doing the landscaping and maintenance of properties that already have  been demolished.”

U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, called the HHS award a “win” for Trumbull County.

“By creating opportunities for residents to improve their own community, TNP is living up to its mission to empower citizens and serve every neighborhood,” Brown said.

Martin said he hopes to complete the renovation project sometime in 2017.  Once completed, the carriage house will be used for training  and storage.

Building a Better Warren already has two employees. It expects to build up to eight during the five-year grant program.

The HHS Community Economic Development federal grant program works to help low-income individuals and families become self-sufficient through employment and business development opportunities.”

Read the complete article here.

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OCDCA announces microbusiness development program grantees

These past two months have been a very exciting time for OCDCA and its members.

Earlier this month, through the use of an impartial review committee, we awarded grants to thirteen members for their microbusiness programs through the Ohio Microbusiness Development Program. We had many great applications and were, unfortunately, unable to fund everyone.

The purpose of the Ohio Microbusiness Development Program is to provide funding for CDCs to further develop a local delivery system that encourages microbusiness development, provides low- and moderate-income households with access to capital for business development and self-employment, and creates and retains long-term jobs in the private sector.

Funding for this can be in the form of either training or technical assistance, or direct assistance to the business in the form of a loan, with loan funds repaid into a local microbusiness revolving loan fund. Funding for this program comes from Ohio Development Services Agency. View a list of all of OCDCA’s funders here.

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Awarded Organizations

Adams and Brown Counties Economic Opportunities, Inc.

Appalachian Center for Economic Networks

Asian Services in Action, Inc.

Community Action Agency of Pike County

Economic and Community Development Institute

Greater Cincinnati Microenterprise Initiative

HHWP Community Action Agency

INCREASE Community Development Corporation

Northeast Shores Development Corporation

Southern Perry Incubation Center for Entrepreneurs

Supports to Encourage Low Income Families

Vinton County Economic Development Board

Youngstown Neighborhood Development Corporation

Congrats to all of the selected organizations! For more information about the Ohio Microbusiness Development Program, please contact David Foust at dfoust@ohiocdc.org.